Schedule

All papers will be provided 6 weeks in advance.
Each panelist will give only a 10-15 minute summary, followed by discussion.

Note: Titles listed below are tentative.


Location: MIT Samberg Conference Center (E52), 6th floor (Map)

Day 1: Thursday May 12, 2016

8:00 am – Continental breakfast

8:30 am – Introduction by the organizers

8:45 – 10:45 am – Panel 1: The Early Moderns on Science

Ralph Lerner, Panel Chair
Benjamin Franklin Professor Emeritus
The College and the Committee on Social Thought
The University of Chicago

Svetozar Y. Minkov
Department of History and Philosophy
Roosevelt University
“The Place of the Treatment of the Conquest of Nature in Francis Bacon’s On the Wisdom of the Ancients

Devin Stauffer
Associate Professor of Government
The University of Texas at Austin
“Hobbes on Nature and its Conquest”

Harvey Mansfield
Professor of Government
Harvard
“Machiavelli and the Discovery of Fact”

10:45 – 11:15 am – Break


11:15 – 1:15 pm – Panel 2: The Ancient View of Mastery of Nature

Bryan Garsten, Panel Chair
Professor of Political Science and Humanities
Chair, Humanities Program
Yale University

Robert Bartlett
Behrakis Professor of Hellenic Political Studies
Boston College
“Classical Political Philosophy and the Conquest of Nature”

Paul Ludwig
Tutor
St. John’s College Annapolis
“Lucretius on Rebelling against the ‘Laws’ of Nature”

Christopher Nadon
Associate Professor
Government
Claremont McKenna College
“Xenophon and the Conquest of Nature”

1:15 – 2:15 pm – lunch


2:15 – 4:15 pm – Panel 3: The Second Wave of Modernity

Susan Shell, Panel Chair
Professor of Political Science
Boston College

Arthur M. Melzer
Professor of Political Science
Michigan State University
“Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Return to Nature vs. Conquest of Nature”

Michael Gillespie
Jerry G. and Patricia Crawford Hubbard Professor of Political Science
Duke University
“Beyond the Island of Truth: Hegel and the Shipwreck of Science”

Richard Velkley
Celia Scott Weatherhead Professor of Philosophy
Tulane University
“Kant on Organism and History: Ambiguous Endings”

5:00 – 6:30 pm – Peter Thiel on the Mastery of Nature

Peter Thiel
Partner
Founders Fund
“The Formula for Immortality”


Day 2: Friday May 13, 2016

8:00 am – Continental breakfast

8:30 am – Introduction

8:45– 10:45 am – Panel 4: The Early Moderns on Politics and Morality as Connected with Mastery of Nature

Vickie Sullivan, Panel Chair
Professor of Political Science
Tufts University

Diana Schaub
Professor of Political Science
Loyola University Maryland
“Discourse on the Motives that Ought to Encourage Us to the Sciences Montesquieu”
“Montesquieu, Commerce, and Science”

Jerry Weinberger
University Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Michigan State University
“Francis B. and Ben F. on Religion and Mastery of Nature”

Stuart Warner
Department of Philosophy
Roosevelt University
Director, Montesquieu Forum
“Devising Nature: An Essay on Descartes’ Discourse on Method

10:45 – 11:15 am Break


11:15 – 1:15 pm – Panel 5: The Third Wave of Modernity

Steven Smith, Panel Chair
Alfred Cowles Professor of Government and Philosophy
Yale University

Mark Blitz
Fletcher Jones Professor of Political Philosophy
Claremont McKenna College
“Heidegger and the Limits to Nature’s Mastery”

Daniel Doneson
Lecturer, Department of Chemical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
“Nietzsche, Heidegger and the Problem of a Mastery of Nature”

Lise van Boxel
Professor
St. John’s College (Santa Fe/Annapolis)
“Nietzsche: The Motion That Is Man”

1:15 – 2:15 pm – lunch


2:15 – 4:15 pm – Panel 6: Contemporary Issues of Modern Science

Nathan Tarcov, Panel Chair
Professor in the Committee on Social Thought
The Department of Political Science, and the College at the University of Chicago

Adam Schulman
Tutor
St. John’s College, Annapolis
“What is Natural Philosophy? The Perspective of Contemporary Science”

Bernhardt L. Trout
Raymond F. Baddour, ScD, (1949) Professor of Chemical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
“Quantum Mechanics and Political Philosophy”

4:15 – 4:30 pm – Concluding remarks

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